Badminton Basics

Although the exact origins of badminton are unclear, games based on a shuttlecock and a battledore were played in China, Japan, India, Siam and Greece over 2000 years ago.

Between 1856 and 1859 a game known as ‘battledore and shuttlecock’ started to evolve into the modern game of badminton at “Badminton House”, the Duke of Beaufort’s country estate in England. Similar games were played in Poona India around this time and a badminton code of conduct was drawn up in 1877.

The aim of battledore and shuttlecock played at “Badminton House” was to keep the shuttlecock in the air for as long as possible by hitting the shuttle between two or more people. The reverse is true today.

The aim now is to finish a rally as quickly as possible by scoring winning points against your opponent. In 1893, the Badminton Association of England was formed to administer badminton internationally from England.

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Every time a rally is played a point is scored

To win a competitive match, players must win two games. Each game is played up to 21 points, the exception of this is if the score reaches 20-20. In this situation the game continues until one player gains a 2-point lead. If the score reaches 29-29 then a sudden death point is played to determine the winner of the game.

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1992 Barcelona Olympic Games

1996 Atlanta Olympic Games

2000 Sydney Olympic Games

2004 Athens Olympic Games

2008 Beijing Olympic Games

2012 London Olympic Games